Apostolica

The Apostolate (By the Spirit)
of the Resurrected Christ in His Ascension

a chronology

 

I. Its Beginning in Jerusalem

EASTER takes place on Sunday, the 9th day of April, in the year 30 C.E.
On that day (see John 20) Jesus ascends to the Father and begins to dwell in the disciples as the Holy Spirit
(the co-inherence of the Persons of the Trinity now includes, retroactively, the entire humanity of the Son).

The ACTS of the Apostles, chapters 1—5        (the years 30 to 31 C.E.)

Chapter 1: The ASCENSION. Jesus ascends into heaven on Thursday, May 18 (in 30 C.E. ).

Chapter 2: PENTECOST: Sunday May 28, 30 C.E. Having “poured out” the Holy Spirit “on all flesh,”
Jesus now baptizes—dunks—his entire
qahal (permanently) into the same.
The Holy Spirit thus anoints, equips and enables this
qahal (the church)
to be—each member—witnesses of Jesus, and to carry out his apostolate to all people
(for all people are ready to be “ignited,” the Holy Spirit having been already “poured” on them).
The establishment of the church in Jerusalem.

Explanation: God breathes the divine Spirit of God into every creature to give it life (that is, a spirit).
With the coming (the incarnation) of Jesus, the divine Spirit becomes the “Holy” Spirit;
and with the resurrection, the humanity of Jesus retroactively now co-inheres eternally the Holy Spirit
(the Son and Spirit being already co-inherent, and the natures being inseparable from the Person).
In this way the “Holy Spirit is poured on all flesh”: on every creature in which is the breath of life.
Consequently, now when the spirit in each person is enlightened (I said “ignited”) by the Gospel,
the Holy Spirit begins to “dwell” in the person’ spirit as Jesus, beginning the work of saving the soul
to incorporate the person’s entire humanity into the divine co-inherence, thus eventually glorifying it.

Chapters 3—5: The remainder of the year and the following year (June 30 C.E.—31 C.E.).
The beginning of the apostolate in Jerusalem—
announcing Jesus’ resurrection, and building the church—
and its conflict with the Sadducean and priestly establishment there:
picking up where Jesus left off during Holy Week.

II. Its Initial Expansion into Samaria and the Jewish Diaspora; the Seven and the Calling of Saul

Acts 6—8        (the year 31 C.E.; Stephen is martyred after the fall of Lucius Aelius Sejanus)

Acts 9:1-22        (October of 31 C.E., eighteen months after Easter)

(Saul is in “Arabia”—see Galatians 1:17—in the years 31 to 33 C.E.,
possibly in Kokhba, the Nabataen territory, or the wilderness SE of Damascus)

Acts 9:23-25        (the year 33 C.E.)

Acts 9:26-30        (the years 33 to 34 C.E.; Saul has a vision in the Temple, see Acts 22:17-21)

Acts 9:31        (from the year 34 until April of 41 C.E.)

(Saul is in Syria-Cilicia, where Tarsus is, from the year 34 to 42 C.E.,
probably establishing churches: compare Galatians 1:23 and Acts 15:41)

III. Its Opening to the Gentiles

(Caligula tries to place his statue in the Temple during the winter of 39/40 C.E.)

Acts 9:32—11:18        (in the year 40 C.E., around the time of Agrippa I’s accession)

IV. The Beginning of the Apostolate to the Gentiles

Acts 11:19-21        (around the years 36 to 41 C.E.)

(Antioch is the first church with a substantial number of uncircumcized Gentiles, that is, Gentiles who have not converted to Judaism. In Acts 11:26, the term “Christians” has a Latin ending and legally distinguishes them from Jews. Perhaps this term is connected to the dispatch of Vitellius to Syria in the winter of 36/37 C.E., or as a result of disturbances in Antioch in 39/40.)

Acts 11:22-24        (the year 41 C.E.)

Acts 11:25-26        (the year 42 C.E.)

(It is sometime during the years 42 to 44 C.E. that Saul has the ecstatic experience he describes in 2 Corinthians 12:2-4.)

Acts 11:27-28        (around the years 39 to 42 C.E.; the Sabbatical Year is between 41 and 42 C.E.)

(Egypt begins to have agricultural problems causing shortages in Rome in the winter of 41/42 which lasts until 43 C.E. All of Syria begins to experience the dearth during the years 44 to 49, the severity being greatest in the years 44 to 46 C.E. Antioch is wealthier than Jerusalem.)

Acts 11:29        (around the years 41 to 44 C.E.)

Acts 11:30        (the year 44 C.E.)

Acts 12:1-19a        (in April of 41 C.E.)

The Circular Epistle of JAMES the Lord’s Brother
to the Churches and Synagogues of Palestine       
(written around the year 42 C.E.)

(Traditions have the Apostle Peter going to Rome around the years 41-43.)

Acts 12:19b-24        (in the year 44 C.E.)

Acts 12:25        (in the winter of 44/45 C.E.)

Acts 13—14        (the years 45-47 C.E.)

(Peter is in Antioch in the winter of 47/48, see Galatians 2:11a:
the introductory words of 2:11-21 understood as pluperfect to verses 1-10.)

Acts 15:1-4        (in May of 48 C.E.; see Galatians 2:1-10)

The Epistle of the Apostle Paul to the Churches of Southern Galatia
[known as GALATIANS]       (written in Jerusalem in May of 48 C.E. and delivered by Titus)

Acts 15:5-35        (still in May of 48 C.E.)

V. Paul’s Work in Macedonia and Achaia

Acts 15:36—17:12        (from 48 C.E. to the winter of 49/50 C.E.)

The Epistle of the Apostle Paul and His Coworkers to the Church of Thessalonica
[known as SECOND THESSALONIANS]        (written—by Silas?—in the winter of 49/50 C.E.)

Acts 17:13—18:5a        (in the year 50 C.E.)

Another Epistle of the Apostle Paul and His Coworkers to the Church of Thessalonica
[known as FIRST THESSALONIANS]        (written by Paul in the year 50 C.E.)

Acts 18:5b—22        (the years 51 to 52 C.E.)

When the Gospel according to MATTHEW Was Written        (in 52 C.E.)

VI. Paul’s Work in Ephesus and His Completion of the Aegean Circle

Acts 18:23—19:20        (the years 52 to 54 C.E.)

The Epistle of the Apostle Paul and His Coworker Timothy to the Church of Philippi
[known as PHILIPPIANS]        (written from prison in Ephesus in the year 54 or 55 C.E.)

The Letter of the Apostle Paul (with His Coworker Timothy)
Sent through Their Coworker Philemon in Laodicea to Apphia and Archippus in Colossae
[known as PHILEMON]         (written from prison in Ephesus in the year 54 or 55 C.E.)

The Epistle of the Apostle Paul and His Coworker Timothy to the Church of Colossae
[known as COLOSSIANS]         (written from prison in Ephesus in the year 54 or 55 C.E.)

An Epistle of the Apostle Paul (with Sosthenes) to the Church of Corinth
[known as FIRST CORINTHIANS]         (written from Ephesus in the year 55 C.E.)

Acts 19:21-22a         (in the year 55 C.E.)

The Letter of the Apostle Paul to His Coworker Titus in Crete
[known as TITUS]         (written in shorthand in the year 55 C.E.)

When the Gospel according to LUKE Was Written        (in the year 56 C.E.)

Another Epistle of the Apostle Paul to the Church of Corinth
[known as SECOND CORINTHIANS 10—13:10]        (written in the year 56 C.E.)

Acts 19:22b—20:1         (written in the year 56 C.E.)

Another Epistle of the Apostle Paul with His Coworker Timothy to the Church of Corinth
[known as SECOND CORINTHIANS 1—9 and 13:11-14]        (written in the year 56 C.E.)

Acts 20:2-3a        (in the year 56 C.E.)

The Epistle of the Apostle Paul to the Synagogues and the Church of Rome
[known as ROMANS 1—15]        (written from Corinth in the winter of 56/57 C.E.)

1:26-27, Is This Passage Referring to Homosexuality? (2016)
5:1-5, The Name into Which We Are Baptized Is the Form of Our Life (2016)

The Cover Letter that the Apostle Paul Wrote to the Church of Ephesus
When He Sent Them a Copy of Galatians, 1st and 2nd Corinthians, and Romans 1—15
[known as ROMANS 16]        (written in Corinth in the winter of 56/57 C.E.)

Acts 20:3b-4        (in the year 57 C.E.)

The Letter of the Apostle Paul to His Coworker Timothy
[known as FIRST TIMOTHY]         (written in shorthand in the year 57 C.E.)

20:5-38        (in the year 57 C.E.)

VII. The “Offering of the Gentiles”: Paul in Jerusalem and Caesarea

Acts 21—24:23        (in the year 57 C.E.)

Another Letter of the Apostle Paul to His Coworker Timothy
[known as SECOND TIMOTHY]        (written in shorthand in the year 57 C.E.)

The Circular Epistle of the Apostle Paul Sent to the Church in Ephesus
[known as EPHESIANS]        (written in the year 57 C.E.)

Notes on Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians:

“The Epistle to the Ephesians” was a circular epistle addressed to the church in Ephesos, the base for his Aegean apostolate (or mission), meant for them to circulate among the churches of the Anatolian plateau and around the Aegean basin, and for the churches to copy. (Marcion’s copy, we see as a case in point, was addressed to the church of Laodicea.) The apostle Paul wrote this, his last extant epistle, when he was a Roman prisoner in Caesarea Maritima in 57 CE, after he made his defense before the governor Felix (Acts 24:1-21). Felix ordered the centurion to keep him under arrest but free from restriction, “and that none of his own people should be prevented from seeing to his needs” (24:23). Following his shorthand note to Timothy (what became for us what we know as the longhand “Paul’s 2nd Letter to Timothy”), it was perhaps intended as a “legacy” document, summarizing his vision for the churches.

1:3-6, 15-19 (prepared on January 3, 2016)

Acts 24:24-26       (the years 57 to 59 C.E.)

The Epistle of Priscilla to the Church of Jerusalem
[known as HEBREWS]        (written in 59 C.E.)

Acts 24:27        (in the year 59 C.E.)

VIII. The Apostolate’s Extension to Rome, and the Fallout

Acts 25-28        (the years 59 to 62 C.E.)

When the ACTS of the Apostles Was Written        (the year 62 C.E.)

The FIRST Epistle of the Apostle PETER        (written by Peter in 64 C.E.)

The SECOND Epistle of the Apostle PETER        (written in 66 C.E.)

When the Gospel according to MARK Was Written        (around 68-70 C.E.)

The Epistle of JUDE the Lord’s Brother        (written around 80 C.E.)

IX. The Recapitulation

When the Gospel according to the Lord’s Disciple JOHN the “Elder” Was Written
(in Ephesus around the year 90 C.E.)

The FIRST, SECOND and THIRD Epistles of the Disciple JOHN the “Elder”
(written in Ephesus between the years 90 and 95 C.E.)

The REVELATION of Jesus Christ
(written down by the Anatolian prophet John around the years 95 and 96 C.E.)